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Can you help this person? They have a problem with
Safety Issues and need some advice.

 

See the next submission
This is the original problem from an employee...
I received a email from an employee stating that he almost knocked over another employee over coming thru the warehouse doors. The employee thinks that because the warehouse doors don't have any windows in them that it is a safety issue because you can't see people coming in or out.

Would this be a safety issue? We have been in this building for over 7 years and have not had any issues with the warehouse doors. Would we need to consider having doors with windows installed for the employees that access them?  
   
Employee: grutledge
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A visitor of this site offers this as a possible solution...
Our company has placed mirrors at both entrances and exits of warehouse doors where there is a lot of foot traffic and also machine traffic, i.e. tugs, forklifts, bikes, golf carts etc.
Contributor: visitor
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A visitor of this site offers this as a possible solution...
I believe this is a safety issue. The fact that there is an "almost" means that you have an incident. From that point of view rate the risk - ? Broken limb? Head injury?
Now weigh that against the cost of fixing the problem
New doors = $$
Used doors = $

If it is a high traffic area you likely want to replace the doors "just in case"

Hope this helps

Contributor: visitor
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A visitor of this site offers this as a possible solution...
Yes - you have a safety issue. You should already have a risk assessment on that particular. Because you haven't had an "accident" it sounds like you have had a number of "near misses" - but they are, for some reason, unreported.

When writing up the Risk Assessment you should consider options such as windows in the doors or heat retaining screens during working hours. Also consider one way working if that is possible and also denying entry to pedestrians if you are using machinery.
Whatever answer you come up with ensure that there is a formal policy and that it is robustly maintained. The next "near miss" may not be.
Contributor: visitor
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A visitor of this site offers this as a possible solution...
That might be something to look at from an <a href="http://training.pryor.com/osha-and-workplace-safety">OSHA compliance perspective</a> whereas the HR department might want to be better informed on building codes, potential hazards in more crowded areas of the office, etc.
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Disclaimer: The advice displayed within this site is not legal advice and is not to be taken as legal or professional advice in any way. Any communication within this forum is intended only to discuss a number of possible options. All ratings have come from site visitors and reflect a peer review only.

 

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